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increase noticing for exemptions. i think it's interesting to note that state c-e-q-a law does not require noticing for exemptions. however, in san francisco, the approval of many currently exempt projects are noticed. this proposal would augment our existing noticing procedures by requiring the notice for exemptions. and as i explained earlier, the notes would explain that you have the right to appeal a hearing from the project. it would provide postings of approval actions and inform the public on exactly how and when to file an appeal. the process is now in place is less clear to the public as it relies on many things. we have to look at board of the clerk procedures. there is a city attorney opinion letter. and every individual determination for an appeal if appropriate, is it timely, has to be reviewed by the city attorney for review by determination. important to the hpc in particular, the proposed procedures would change nothing about how historic resources are evaluated under see qualitiv so, there is some confusion as you heard about that. there would be -- the only change relativ
'll play his response. >>> still ahead tonight, you better stop textin texting. if the government and law enforcement has their way, they may live on for years. we'll exa abou examine about hog brother is about to impede your right of speech. >>> egypt is now burning. where is sandra flack. you don't think that makes sense? the muslim brotherhood are about to trample all over women's rights. where are the women up in arms about the so-called war on women. they stand in silence now. why? ♪ [ male announcer ] how could a luminous protein in jellyfish, impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> it has become a familiar scene. egyptian citizens flooding the streets demanding their inalienabl
-- all that the existing ordinance does and all the proposed ordinance does is fill gaps in state law. state law does not address -- state law was changed 10 years ago to allow an administrative appeal to the board -- to elected body if the elected body is the decision maker. we've had 10 years now of having no procedure in place. this is trying to establish a procedure. so, number one, it's addressing a gap in state law that did not establish procedures for such administrative appeals. secondly, it addresses a gap in state law specifically around exemptions regarding noticing. as ann marie stated, there is absolutely no requirement under state law for noticing exemptions. the noticing that we already have, either by ordinance or by practice goes way beyond anything that state law requires. what this does is aloe exceptionally try to address the fairness question in saying that since there is extensive noticing, it happens on many actions by the city, in particular extensive noticing by anything that this department does, that we want to maximize noticing through using existing notici
that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
's law in honor of her, she had been in and around sacramento for a long time. so the legislation in and of itself, i don't think it's going to work miracles, but it is definitely on people's radar now and i think you hear it in the media more and more. the reason we have a suicide barrier and the reason we are having legislation like this is because of the parents and the families because they are the ones that hurt the most and i would imagine part of the therapeutic thing, you've got to tell this story and telling it in the right place and the right time can be very effective. so seth's law does require that if you witness an act of bullying, that you must report it. >> is that for anybody? >> anyone, but particularly teachers. there is a -- sometimes we see things that aren't very pleasant and if you've ever taken it to muni, you know what i mean. your tendency is to turn away. i heard the word faggot on the play ground when i taught. the teachers were intimidated, they didn't want to be seen to have any empathy because that might reflect on them. it's crazy but that's p
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
donkey, or lack thereof. i love the picture. it reminded me of a priceless letter he sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american
the first thing you do in j.a.g. school, you have a discussion about the difference between the law of war and criminal law. and every military lawyer is taught from the very beginning of their career that law of war detention is designed to neutralize the enemy and to gather intelligence about the enemy. there is a reason that when we capture somebody in a war, we don't give them a trial by jury, we don't give them a lawyer. we have got 3,000 people in american military custody in afghanistan that were captured on the battlefield. and they are held under the law of war because we don't want to let them go back to killing us, and they are not given a lawyer because we're not trying to solve a crime, we're trying to win a war. and here's the question. to my good friend from california, i don't want anyone to believe that under the law of war construct that we have created over the last seven or eight years, that you can be put in jail because you look like a muslim, that you sound like a muslim, that you have got a name muhammad. what happened to japanese american citizens, they were
law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental disconnect between how we view philosophy of free will and human control on the criminal side versus the civil side and not surprisingly on both sides "the state wins" because on the criminal side you go to prison and on the civil side, you get incarcerated civilly. >> i don't think that's much of a disconnect. i think -- so i agree with you the test has changed. that's not what i'm talking about. if you look at the kind
there are some who have said that there are already laws in the books that cover this situation. that is simply not the case. which i whies berkeley, san joÉe and other california cities have their own public nudity restriction beyond the if there were already laws in place to address this situation, i would not have introduced this legislation. public nudity, currently, is not -- is legal in san francisco, other than in our parks, port, and in restaurants. there's been a suggestion that we should use lewd behavior laws, particularly the indecent exposure provisions of the california penal code. i don't agree with that. i think that using lewd behavior laws is problematic and ineffective. first of all, there are going to be a lot of borderline cases about whether something is lewd or not lewd and you're putting a police officer in a terrible position of trying to determine is this person a little bit aroused or not aroused, is that adornment on the person's genitals lewd or not lewd, did he shake his genitals a little too vigorously to draw attention. no police officer should make that determi
a proposed law that would reduce felony drug possession crimes to a misdemeanor. this is what 13 states have done. we not only bring these issues to the forefront, but have the opportunity to participate -- and we have cards that you could fill out and questions. this promises to be a year of reform and change like we have never seen, and we now see prisoner reentry programs being implemented. we're still spending too much money and resources and not enough on rehabilitation and reentry. this november, the voters will decide on limiting the three strikes law. issues and measures long overdue. it is clear there is much more that needs to be done. according to a study that was published this month -- since 1989, 2000 people have been wrongfully incarcerated and they served collectively, 10,000 years. an average of 11 years person. i would like to thank the people who made this summit possible. memoranda -- amy devon -- many volunteers and all of our speakers and panelists. i would like to thank the co- sponsors, and the bar association of san francisco. i would like to thank them for their hel
, to say that he's been law enforcement for 30 years and bring back 30-year experience to this consideration of this bill, and he said this bill makes sense because drug treatment works and this is in spite of the fact we'll be battling the district attorneys along with many other arms of public safety. [laughter] >> we've got the data, we've got the facts and we know this will provide great benefit to our communities, to our neighborhoods, and to all of california. thank you for your support. [applause] >> tal, i want to go back to the question that marty posed earlier, which is in effect this idea that in order to incentivize people making the decision to seek treatment that the fear of a felony conviction or possible state prison sentence could play a positive role. you talk to a lot of people charged with crimes who are trying to make the decision of what decision to make, what is the primary motivation you see coming from them. how do they decision make on dispositions related to drug possession as a felony? >> i think that for a lot of people it does have to be a
chris 26 years ago at hastings law school, two blocks from here. we were in the same section in the same study group. when we finished law school we both went to the east coast to work for large law firms. over the years we stayed in close touch. when chris was back from over seas we were frequent tennis partners and would get together for dinners and other events in washington. over the years our families became friends as well. it's been such a pleasure to come to know them and chris's many friends in washington and to watch his career unfold. we met on the first day of school. i sat down in our civil procedure class next to a person who turned out to be named chris highland. shortly thereafter chris stevens sat down next to me. the three of us went to lunch afterwards and became friends from that day forward. chris never tried to be someone special but he was someone special. when we were at hastings his charm and wit were on display from the start. in class he was very articulate and seemed as later in life always very poised and well spoken and at ease. i think our professors loved
. smith: mr. speaker, h.r. 6620, the former presidents protection act of 2012, amends federal law to uniformerly provide lifetime secret service protection to all of america's former presidents. i want to thank the gentleman from south carolina, mr. gowdy, and the gentleman from virginia, mr. scott, for sponsoring this commonsense bipartisan legislation. america has a responsibility to protect its presidents and its families and not simply while they serve in office. we also have a duty to ensure the ongoing safety of those who serve in america's highest elected office after they leave office. in 1958 congress first authorized secret service protection for former presidents, which was limited to a reasonable period of time after a president leaves office. congress expanded this to lifetime protection in 1965. but in 1994, congress once again limited secret service protection for former presidents. this time to 10 years after a president leaves office. this 10-year restriction applied to presidents who took office after january 1, 1997. the role of the former president has changed
of the challenge moving forward and i have had many conversations with superintendents and law enforcement officials as well about how we can address this data integrity issue and how a school won't be hoisted by their own petard because they had the courage to collect the data when other schools kind of look the other way. so, again, it's a hard question to answer in ways that are other than anecdote. there have been survey data and things of that nature, but i feel uncomfortable saying unequivocally this is what we know, these are the trends. i like to be evidence based and i'm not sure the evidence allows that. >> roslyn, challenges to you and secretary duncan. >> for the first time you can see data for the first time about the -- discipline and students referred to law enforcement, suspensions more than once. on the bullying and harassment we are also collecting for the first time ever data on the number of incidents of students disciplined for bullying and harassment. they are not exactly reliable. lots of folks aren't collecting this. our collection is at the school level so you
than laws, it can take decades to pass a good law, we saw those in changes of health care, what year were we starting to talk about revising our health care policies, i think it was 93 and it was 2008 before there was passage of a law so it can take decades and dozens of years, but if we ask for safer products, the market can turn on a dime. in 2007-2008, everyone started talking about bpa in plastics, by 2009, bpa-free plastics were everywhere, so can, not cancer is getting bpa out of food cans and they chased a huge success this year when campbell's soup said we're going to take the bpa out, we're waiting for a timeline from them and waiting for them to replace bpa with something safer, taking that first step was huge, even more significant perhaps is the campaign for safe cosmetics which has been around for about 10 years saying that -- getting johnson & jn -- johnson saying we're going to get carcinogens first out of our baby products across the whole world and that's really significant because they found formaldehyde in baby's johnson shampoo a few years ago, they tested it a f
. this is filling a big gap in state law in terms of administering an appeals process and in terms of noticing. there is quite a bit of commentary which, i'll restrain from going too much into in term of where it's coming from, that suggests that somehow this proposal is being consistent with state law. it is restating state law in a couple instances. but since this is essentially gap-filling legislation, it is not going beyond or inconsistent with state law. * i think the issue that you are most likely to get confused about, whether by confusion of the speakers or by deliberate representation -- misrepresentations by the speakers, is this issue of substantial evidence. and without going into a long legal treatise, there's two ways in which the term substantial evidence is used in c-e-q-a. one is an evidencery standard. one is an appellate standard. * the way in which this is introduced in this legislation has to do with evidence and very simply, if you want to make a case for conclusion, whether you is the city or you is the appellant, you need to substantial evident to support it. that's all
present member dhaka by law. it's a great pleasure to be reviewed. i feel so happy. thank you for your hospitality. this is my first visit as the president-elect of mexico, and i also want to congratulate you for your victory last november 6th for your second term as president to the united states and we wish you great success. i know you have a great task before you but i trust that you will be doing a wonderful job and i also want to thank you, president obama for having the vice president joe biden were go to mexico for the inaugural ceremony next saturday december 1st. i feel so pleased to be able to have the vice president biden represent you in mexico, and of course we are waiting for you in the delegation. >> [speaking in native tongue] the >> this is an opportunity we only have every 12 years. you will be starting your next four year term. i will be starting a six year administration in mexico as you know and i think this is a great opportunity for all of us to have a closer link of brotherhood and sisterhood and collaboration and of course of great accomplishments we might hav
, we want to pass laws. >> radiation is the longest and best studied exposure link to breast cancer and what can we do about that, some radiation is naturally occurring, but we know that since 1980, radiation exposures for the average person have doubled and most of that is probably due to a 600 % increase in medical radiation, we're being exposed to a lot more radiation from medical tests, sometimes that's the only option, it's worth that added risk because the alternative is really dangerous sometimes, but we want to ensure those scans and those medical imaging tests are the most appropriate, are at the right dose, especially for kids are a lot of times, they don't know how to scale down for a child-size body and the machines may not calibrate or have clear directions on how to make that happen so in our own lives, we can ask our health care provides, are there safer alternative, mri or ultrasounds for doing this test, and then if you have kids and they need a test, ensure and ask questions about the safest dose and if they have machines that can calibrate to kids, and then we hav
rest on our way out of this problem. i no longer want to hear those words. this is not to give the law- enforcement a short shrift. i have had an impact on my husband's life, some of the unwanted. but he has had an impact on mind. i have done extensive work with law enforcement, with the lapd and the los angeles county sheriff's. i am here to tell you that crime has been driven down in los angeles because of their efforts, but not only because of their efforts. so what does the collaboration look like. i want you to keep some ideas in mind. there is no first among equals. what we learned in los angeles was that oppression alone was not the answer. it did not work. there were record highs in gang violence in 2005. i want to tell you what has happened between 2005 and 2012. number one, the grass roots -- the disorganize, fragmented, passionate grass roots must be part of this. the community members who go to county supervisors meetings, the members who pass out fliers, the youths who have been in the juvenile justice system that are now part of the coalition -- those individuals must hav
, the health care law may face in the coming days and in the coming years with julie rovner of n.p.r., and we'll be right back. >> program under began under tugwell who was one of the advisers to president franklin roosevelt. to document the conditions under which people were living, this was back when we didn't have television. we had radio, but a lot of places didn't have electricity so they couldn't listen to the radio broadcast to find out what was going on in parts of the country. royce striker, who was an economist from columbia university, he was the head of this project, and in 1939 when kodak introduced color film, they sent film to roy striker to have his photographers try out, to see what they could do. kodak was trying to establish a new market, a new product and they wanted people who would know how to use it effectively to try it out and publicize it. >> america of the 1930's and 40's comes to life through the eye of the camera as they share some of the 1,600 color photographs taken during the depression and world war ii. sundays at 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. eastern. part of amer
to kids, and then we have to see these changes with the laws so if fda has proposals out for medical imaging around kids so you know how to downsize a radiation dose for kids who is smaller, their physical size is narrower, and also to make machines more accountable and more clear in how they work. >> [inaudible]. >> it's very low doses but that's an excellent question and i thought somebody would probably ask that. so, the united states preventative services task force in 2009 came out with a proposal to revise guidelines saying that perhaps women aged 40 to 50, there's no cost benefit really for that age group in terms of having mammogram of average risk, so recommended that women start mammography at age ao where the benefits really out weigh the risk, you don't have 40 years left in your life span at that point perhaps, you have 30, you're at a less vulnerable stage of life so there are a lot more benefits for life, your breast cancer risks are higher, so you know, the age 40 to 50, there's still a lot of debate about that and women need to discuss this with their own health care
conflict with state law and increase rather than reduce the city's exposure to c-e-q-a litigation and specifically i'm talking about confusing and unnecessarily complex processes for providing notice of c-e-q-a exemption determinations. under the proposed amendment, members of the public must submit written materials regarding an appeal to the board one full day before the city is required to give notice of the appeal. in other words, you have to give your written materials are due before member of the public are informed that an appeal is happening. the proposed amendments would deem valid prior c-e-q-a approval actions which could force project appellants to file lawsuits even before the board reaches decisions on their appeals in order to avoid c-e-q-a's strict statute of limitations. this could subject the city to additional and unnecessary expensive litigation. and finally, the proposed amendments would force members of the public to file two appeals and pay two appeal fees of $500 each in order to seek review proposed negative declarations before the board of supervisors. i
says he acted reasonable and consistently with the law. >> and in order for mr. mezerilee to be on the lawsuit in that shooting the court has to have determined his conduct shocked the conscience. my argument that that is not the case here. >> a ruling is not expected for at least two months. >> a special visitor in san francisco tonight to eat eet a little humble pie. abc 7 news is live tonight at the home of world series champion san francisco giants. hi, carolyn. nice to have the mayor in town. >> yes. both mayors have mustaches and being encouraged to shave if they're on the losing end of the deal. both declined to do that. detroit dave bing was a good sport today. he said he was trying to be honorable in defeat. detroit mayor and first lady, dave and eve yet bing arrived ready for him to take good on a losing bet. >> are you here under dures? >> absolutely. but it's history now. as a former athlete i respect what happened. i didn't like it from the detroit status point but giants played a wonderful series. >> and the mayor ed lee has bragging rights. what do you think
evidence is the most useful. we have a standard in criminal law called the reasonable person standard. this fictitious person that we measure everybody's conduct by. we say this is the person, the average person, the average juror, the average individual, the kind of conduct that we would expect an average member of society to live up to. well, as it turns out that none of us are quite average, right. and we might actually be much more like people who we share particular brain structures with or people who we share particular environmental and brain similarities to. so we might need to start thinking about more particularized notions of conduct based on what we would expect of a person who has that type of brain structure who had these types of environmental factors and then start to think about how we want to treat them. do we want to hold those people responsible for their actions or less responsible for their actions. are there certain people who would be better subject to medical treatment instead of incarceration. are there certainly people who we actually think would be
on the bill they just debated, changing federal energy efficiency laws. we'll take you live next to the capital, the chair and co-chair of the democratic caucus, just starting a briefing talking about the fiscal cliff and jobs. it's live here on c-span. >> and continues to preach the kind of message that i think the nation needs, one of compromise but one of assurity that we are going to be looking out tore the interest of the middle class and the protection of social security, medicare and medicaid for the people who are in such desperate need of those great programs that are the hallmark of our country. we have repeatedly said and our caucus again just confirmed that job creation equals deficit reduction, and we must put the country back to work. we have proposals that are on the floor. we still believe that even with the -- what little time remains and what little time remains when we're actually working, this is still possible. this is still doable. this is not a democrat or republican issue. republicans believe that america needs to go back to work. it's just a matter of hav
if they have high density. the law goes into affect april 1, 2013. dan? >> yes. thank you. >> coming up here next michael finney with the high tech gift that can't keep up with demands this holiday season. >> also, a sheriff goes back to school to tackle a serious subject. parents concerns over a registered sex offender allowed to volume lun near a school. >> and apple sends a big message to customers about quality control. a product that got a manager fired. stay with us. >>> here is a live look at the campus of oikos university. the school community holding a concert and dedicating a garden this evening to victims of that shooting rampage on the campus in april. seven people died tlchl the victims included students and staff members. prosecutors say the former nursing student one goh was the gunman captured in a shopping sent center in alameda. goh pled got yilt -- guilty to the charges. >> today a federal judge denied a national rifle association nra a preliminary injunction against two san francisco gun laws. the city attorney argued the ordinance reasonably helped public safety without
college in maine, he also went to uc- berkeley law school and finished in 1978. he and his wife have two daughters. i also want to mention, prior to becoming mayor, one of the key points in his contributions to the community is after he completed law school, he worked as a managing attorney for the san francisco asian law caucus, where he was an advocate for affordable housing and the rights of immigrants and renters. mayor lee -- [applause] >> thank you. welcome to city hall. the people's city hall, san francisco. i want you all to note that that was such a wonderful rendition of our national anthem. please give another applause to the millennium -- melanie and her daughter. i am so excited about all of you and seen so many of you from all over our state. come to city hall anin san francisco, welcome. i would like to welcome the former secretary of transportation. [applause] thank you for being here. thank you, john, thank you. our board of supervisors comment david chiu, thank you very much. david campos, thank you for being here. he is our adopted asian brother. we have so many of our
. the federal government does trump state law. people ask, how can we do it right? i tell them go talk to the chief of police in your city, but understand that this is, no matter what you do, a violation of federal law. and if the dea decides that they're going to prosecute you they can, and they will. the year i bought this place, i was rolling pretty hard, living large, you know? thinking you know, complacent like (bleep) everything's cool i'm bad, whatever. (bleep) camp'd on, big time. they came, dea came looking for me specifically, they didn't know who i was, but they photographs, aerials, they had the whole (bleep) thing, had warrants sworn out and i was scared. so i took that money and i bought this place, and i chilled for a year. myself, i know i've done various things in the past.. such as? such as, oh i was a firefighter for years, i was a general contractor, building contractor. i did have a travel agency, come to think of it (laughing), you know, various things. but it's good to maintain a straight sort of an image so people don't just mark you for what you really are righ
of these cases is a challenge to a federal law called the defense of marriage act passed by congress in 1996, signed by president clinton. and it says if a couple a legally married under state law, one of the nine states that now or soon will grant the right for same-sex couples to get married, those marriages are not recognized under federal law and as a practical matter, that deprives those couples of about 1,000 federal benefits. that law has been challenged by lawsuits in several states. if seems pretty likely the court will take that case because it'sen validating an act of congress. so it seems pretty likely that the court will take that or we could find that out this afternoon. now, the other big thing we're watching is the challenge to california's proposition 8, the voter approved measure that was passed in 2008 that ended gay marriage in california. two lower courts have said it's unconstitutional and we're waiting to see if the supreme court will take that case, as well. we should know as you say any minute. >> let's go back to the defense of marriage act here because this is espe
of employees he has to less than 50 so he won't be subject to penalties under the 2010 health law. so right now the federal government is keeping him from offering jobs. that hurts the people who need jobs and who would be happy to be on a payroll where they would be putting their own contributions into social security and medicare. increasing taxes means less growth and fewer jobs, and that's not balanced. three years ago i made a pledge to oppose tax increases. i made that pledge to the citizens i serve and to no one else, and i made it because tax increases will hurt them. when jen, the owner of la petite cuisine in new york says the best thing i can do is give her a break from high taxes, i believe her. i ran for congress to help jen and all the small business people like her who are the engines of job creation. i ran for congress to help all the people who need employers like jen to hire them. these good people deserve better than temporary fixes. they deserve a plan that solves our economic problems for the long term. they deserve a plan that goes beyond politics and shows a commitment to
-sex marriage will be lawful. >> marriages would be able to begin once the 9th circuit issues a mandate. the 9th circuit is expected to issue that mandate quickly, possibly within a week. but uc hastings law professor rory little says he's hopeful the supreme court will review this case. >> it'd be great if they denied it and same-sex marriage went forward two weeks from now. but the national question, should the constitution permit the banning of same-sex marriage, there's a lot of disuniformity. the supreme court's job is to settle that! so i think the right result is to grant review in the prop 8-case and use it as a vehicle to settle the law more nationally. >> reporter: if that happens, briefs will be filed, and the case will be argued early next year with the decision likely by june of next year. >> reporter: in addition to deciding whether or not to review prop 8, the u.s. protestor will also decide whether or not to review the federal defense was marriage act. it's possible they could decide to review one or the other or both or neither. dan kerman, kron4. >>> in sports one of the nfl's
federal law defines marriage as between a man and a woman and allows the government to deny federal assistance such at social security survivor benefits to same sex couples even if they're legally married. several lower courts have struck down the law as a violation of the constitution's equal protection clause but thomas peters of the national organization for marriage says there's no right to same sex marriage in the institution. >> the federal government and our elected officials through congress have a responsibility and right to protect marriage as a union of one man and one woman. we hope the supreme court will follow the precedent and respect the wishes of the representatives of the officials in congress. >> they did not say which of the ten same sex marriage cases on its docket it plans to take up. that news could come as early osmond. but whichever cases it chooses legal experts say this supreme court term is likely to have a profound influence on the future of same sex marriage. chip reed, cbs news the supreme court. >> a federal judge is considering whether to block calif
, they are all happy. thank you. [applause] >> our board of supervisors is very important to us. they make laws that we have to follow. it gives me great pleasure to introduce the president of the board of supervisors, david chiu. [applause] >> good afternoon. first, if any of you have ever wondered what an ls -- and elected officials sounds like with anesthesia and his mouth, i want to let you know that i got out of a dental chair 20 minutes ago after a few hours of dentists work. but i wanted to give a few remarks of how i think we are doing. i'm very much more are optimistic about how we're doing than four years ago. i read an article from the chronicle and it said that the candidates disagreed on everything, except for the need to crack down on entertainment violence. i did not propose anything for the first six months until there were half a dozen people affected. that was followed by a terrific shooting, which was then followed by an incident in union square. i want to take a moment and thank the san francisco police department for your input. if we pass legislation to require additional
, sean, the real fiscal cliff is when the laws of economics kick in, which they will inevitably do, they have to do, because it can't go on like this. you see the results of hitting the wall in greece, in spain, i3 italy. it will happen here. unlike the european countries, there's nobody to bail us out. >> sean: how much debt could we realistically take on before the bond markets abandon us? >> we're already there. >> sean: so the very people, they voted for barack obama, they voted for more of the same, didn't listen to the arguments we were making, it was a close election, but not close enough, so they're going to be -- the people that he appealed to with class warfare, aren't they the ones most likely to get hurt? >> listen, absolutely. and warren buffett came out today and said,ing hey, he thinks it will a boost for the morale of the middle class. with all due respect to warren buffett, a boost to the middle-class is raising tax rates on the rich? >> sean: why don't they give it to the government if they think it's a moral imperative? >> i don't know what he's trying to drive i
for which the law enforcement and intelligent resources of our government are principally responsible. >> at some point, it will stop being war and go back to plg police work against terrorism as a threat that we fight, but we do not say we are at war with it anymore. how much would it change us back as a country to hit that point? can we go back? have we irreversibly changed ourselves for being at war for 2 years now? is this first word on how we might do it reasonably expect we are going to get there? >> war violates the natch really order of things in which children bury their parents. in war, parents bury their children. we must not accept the conflict as the "new normal." >> joining us is john suskind. thank you for being here. >> my pleasure. >> is there a window of political opportunity right now in washington after this election to change the footing we decided on after 9/11? some of the stuff the president carried over? >> indisputably. that's what people are hopeful about. is this going to be a predicate? an opportunity for the president now that he doesn't have to stand for
, absolutely right now. >> reporter: plummer with more than 50 years' in law enforcement doesn't believe we stumbled into an ongoing investigation? >> if they were checking on this place it wouldn't be a uniform doing it, but clothes plain people. >> reporter: oakland mayor quan says she expected police chief jordan will investigate? >> if he has the information, he will investigate it and i have confidence if there is any misconduct, that he will do the right thing. >> reporter: so far chief jordan has not responded to our repeated requests to interview him, officer ko or anything with the deputy's command staff. >>> oakland police chief howard jordan issued a written response after we aired our story and said, "i take these allegations very seriously and the department opens investigations as soon as the circumstances were brought to my attention. because these are open investigations i am limited in what can be discussed." now to what the state called artous pay, a bureaucratic way for extra pay for taking extra risks, but taxpayers may think of it an un warranted way to take in extra
asked today is it the case of the law that you have to release a 9/1 9/11 dash 911 tape like this or do they keep them private? >> andrea: if a request is made, subpoena to the tape and get reporting they are allowed to because it's part of the public record. once you do the proper steps you can get it. certain case, judge or prosecutor is pending, which we don't have here, because everybody is deceased that was involved in it. they can block it and say it's in the best interest to keep this sealed or out of the public domain. you can imagine a situation like to is very traumatic. this little girl is going to grow up knowing that her father murdered her mother. this tape is out there. it will be on the web. >> dana: any other thoughts about this before we move on? >> greg: it will change the behavior. if you know it will be released, that is the problem. it may prevent people from calling. i never like having them released. if you at a party and someone is in trouble maybe you won't call because you don't want to be involved. >> bob: good point. good point. >> dana: all right. let's mov
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